RADIO ARCHIVES 2  
 

Heads Up! is a news and public affairs program airing every Thursday, from noon to 1:00pm, Mountain Time, featuring Host and Executive Producer Karen Hammer.


Heads Up! is produced in the studios of KGNU, 88.5 FM Boulder / 1390 AM Denver and broadcast as part of that station's Metro series. Thanks to Barbara K. Brown, Ph.D., co-producer.




Below is a selection of interviews on issues which are important and for which the guests are people who are celebrities in their own fields or otherwise have thought-provoking perspectives. For more traditional celebrities, go here.


Heads Up! on the Influence of Identity on Civic Participation

How does one's identity or views of others shape political opinon?

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah discussed with Heads Up! host Karen Hammer his recent books "Cosmipolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers" and "The Ethics of Identity." The discussion focuses on identity, ethics, and participation in civil society.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Heads Up! on Propaganda

When does communication become propaganda?

Heads Up! talked with John H. Brown, whose long career in foreign service led him to become a specialist in propaganda. Now at the University of Southern California after resigning in protest over the handling of communications around the Iraq war, Brown understands both the history and pragmatic application of biased communication.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Heads Up! on Trust in Media and Voting Trends

What trends in voting and media affect elections?

The first segment featured Scott Keefer of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, discussing various studies on voter identification with issues and party, as well as habits around getting the news from the media. As an extra bonus, we'll get an immediate look at a new Pew Research study being issued the morning of the program.

After that, we talked to Jeffrey Dvorkin, former Ombudsman for NPR and newly the Executive Director of the Committee for Concerned Journalists, about whether people have lost their trust in the media and the potential impact that has on the elections process.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


More People Creating Change

Inventors Stan and Iris Ovshinsky plus SONjA of the band Disappear Fear

Earlier in the month in connection with the movie "Who Killed the Electric Car," we visited with Stan and Iris Ovshinsky, inventors of the cell phone and electric/hybrid car batteries. We heard more of that interview that wasn't previously aired.

We also visited with SONjA of the band Disappear Fear about her political activism, and heard a couple of her politically oriented songs.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Confessions of a Former Rush Limbaugh Fan

A compassionate view of current Republican mindsets

We were pleased to visit live in the studio with Jim Derych, former fan of Rush Limbaugh and staunch Republican, who described his journey from conservative to progressive. Jim was on a book tour to promote "Confessions of a Former Dittohead" in Denver and Boulder bookstores. This was not just another Republican slamfest from the left, but rather a thoughtful analysis of why Republicans believe what they believe.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


"Who Killed the Electric Car" Movie Raises Questions

Has there been a plot to kill the electric car?

The metro area was abuzz with alternative energy conferences. This program focused on the Sony Pictures Classics film "Who Killed the Electric Car" will open as well. We talked to Chelsea Sexton, who originally sold the cars discussed in the movie, and along the way became not just a salesperson, but an expert on the history of what happened with the extraordinary EV1. Stan and Iris Ovshinsky, the co-inventors of the battery powering the most successful electric cars, hared with us how their vision became a reality. Brian Daniels, the teacher who created the teachers' guide, was on hand to remind us about how to approach this and other public affairs issues with critical thinking skils. Film Director Chris Pain also shared with us his perspective

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Evangelical Progressives

How the Religious Right distorts their own religious history

Author Randall Balmer joinued us live to discuss his book "Thy Kingdom Come - An Evangelical's Lament: How the Religious Right Distorts the Faith and Threatens America." Balmer, a professor of American religious history at Barnard College, Columbia University, and a visiting professor at Yale University Divinity School, swung through Denver on his book tour.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Holly Near

More on our continuing discussion of individuals changing the world

In the first segment of Metro, Holly Near talked about her combining political activism with music. The second segment featured Denver's The Women's Bean Project.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Peggy McIntosh Returns with Friends on Privilege Systems

Victor Lewis and Hugh Vasquez join us

Peggy McIntosh's most recent visit to Denver at DU and her appearance on KGNU's Metro allowed her to present some of her ideas on white privilege to our area. We joined her again to expand the discussion to include two colleagues, doing work normally heard only at special conferences and discussing other types of privilege. Since most of us don't have the luxury of taking time off to attend a conference, much less to travel to hear this amazing trio, this was an amazing radio opportunity.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Pandemic disease: How threatened are we and how prepared?

Sam Bozzette, expert on infectious diseases at the Rand Corporation, brought his Council on World Affairs participation live to KGNU for a discussion on pandemics.


Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


The Impact of Attitude on Community

Continued "Broken Windows" Analysis with Proponent plus White Privilege Discussion.

We continued our discussion of the "broken windows" theory of crime with part 2, featuring George Kelling, who contributed to the popularization of this theory. Kelling was recently hired by the city of Denver to study how this theory might be applied locally.

In segment 2, we talked to Peggy McIntosh, a Wellesley scholar who was recently in Denver to discuss her famous classic work on white privilege, "Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack."


Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Happy Birthday, Bill Barwick

Retrospective celebrating Cowboy Singer-Songwriter Bill Barwick's 60th Birthday. Award winning cowboy singer-songwriter Bill Barwick talks in words and music about his life and his career.


Listen to the archive.


Do Small Changes Create Larger Community-Wide Benefits?

The impact on both crime and the economy of changing the daily life of community residents. Segment 1 features Bernard Harcourt of Unversity of Chicago, who is a critic of the "broken windows" theory of crime. The theory, which focuses on fixing small problems in a community to prevent serious crime, is the basis for a new study ordered by Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper. Part 1 of a 2 part series. Part 2 featured a proponent of the theory and consultant to Denver, George Kelling.

Segment 2: Individuals can have have an impact on local economies. We heard from Colorado women who are participating in Village Banks to fund projects for other women in places as diverse as Five Points in Denver and Guatemala.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)

Stay tuned for links to background information and additional resources on this topic.


Voting Rights Reform Update

Two think tanks, the more liberal Brookings Institution and the conservative American Enterprise Institute, have just initiated an Election Reform Project, with Barack Obama giving the keynote address at the kickoff event. The show featured part of that keynote, an interview of John Fortier (an AEI scholar), and an update from Tanya Clay (People for the American Way) and Jenny Flanagan (Colorado's chapter of Common Cause) about their own voting rights projects, plus their views on this new project of Brookings and AEI.

Listen to the KGNU archive to hear views from across the political spectrum on this issue, perhaps foreshadowing new proposals that will impact future elections. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Colorado's Japanese-American Internment Camp Connections

We celebrated the recent designation of Granada, CO's Amache Relocation Center, a WWII Japanese-American internment camp, as a National Historic Landmark by talking to a variety of former internees or Coloradoans whose family members spent time in other camps about the internment experience. Guests included California's Congressman Mike Honda, former Colorado State Senator Stan Matsunaka, and KGNU's own Board Member and political actiist Marge Taniwaki.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)

Stay tuned for links to background information and additional resources on this topic.


Impact of Class

We had guest Denver Mayor Hickenlooper, whose economic development plans have been influenced in part by author Richard Florida`s book "The Rise of the Creative Class." Florida himself was on hand to discuss his work in greater detail. author Betsy Leondar-Wright also joined us to discuss how discomfort over class issues undermines efforts to engineer social and political change.

Listen to the KGNU archive . (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Lawsuits on Warrantless Wiretapping (January, 2006)

We interviewed lawyers with the Center for Constitutional Rights and other civil rights organizations which have filed lawsuits recently to prevent warrantless federal wiretapping. We were also joined by Jim Dempsey, constitutional law scholar and policy director for the Center for Democracy and Technology.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


Faith and Social Activism

We featured special guests from the 2006 Iliff Religious Leadership Conference about their views on the intersection between faith and social activism, including Muslim Eboo Patel, Baptist Rev. Gardner Taylor, and Jewish Shaul Gabbay, and Interfaith Alliance of Colorado President Sister Maureen McCormack.

Listen to the KGNU archive. (Note that audio portion starts with remnants of the previous music show, an introduction to my show and then a news clip.)


 
 
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